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Blocks Cytokines Effects

Some T Cells Help Regenerate Stem Cells

A new study from the Center of Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of University of Southern California has found that regulatory T cells ability to decrease the levels of the cytokines interferon (INF)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha helped mice with bone defects to lay down new bone faster through bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC)-mediated bone regeneration and aspirin sped the process up. Most of the time, infection-fighting T cells secrete these cytokines which target and destroy stem cells and inhibit bone production. Now that the role of T-cells in tissue regeneration has been shown, researchers in the field of tissue regeneration are going to have to take into account the immune system’s role.

More at Science Daily | Posted 6 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Cultured T Cells Reduce Transplant Rejection

Tags: Bone Growth, Regulatory T Cells, Stem Cells, Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mediated Bone Regeneration, Tissue Regeneration and the Immune System, Center of Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Ostrow School of

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EGCG Affects Gene Expression

Green Tea Increases Regulatory T Cell Numbers

Research has provided a better understanding of why green tea has many benefits attributed to it such as regulating inflammation, improving how the immune system works and fighting cancer. Experiments demonstrated that EGCG, a polyphenol in green tea that provides most of the health benefits, increase the number of regulatory T cells in the spleen and lymph nodes which act to regulate the immune system so it does not attack itself and damage healthy cells. Many diseases such as type 1 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s are the result of an out of control immune system. It appears that EGCG acts by controlling genes expression. There are drugs currently available that do a better job of increasing the number of T regulatory cells but the risk of toxicity outweighs the benefits.

More at Science Daily | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Red Wine, Green Tea Stop Prostate Cancer Growth

Tags: Autoimmune Diseases, EGCG, Green Tea, Regulatory T Cells, Health Benefits of Green Tea, Polyphenol

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Do Anti-Rejection Drugs' Job

Cultured T Cells Reduce Transplant Rejection

By culturing a patient’s T cells with the drug cilostamide plus the tissue being donated, researchers at Oxford University in Britain were able to control transplant rejection in mice with an immune system that is similar to people. While organ transplant has been a major scientific advancement, most people have to take powerful drugs called immunosuppressants to prevent their immune system from rejecting the donor tissue. These drugs have many side effects and taken for life. A drug normally used to treat vascular problems, cilostamide encourages the T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells which stop rejection. Patients who receive an organ from a living relative or friend will be the first ones placed in human clinical trials which researchers predict are 3 to 5 years away.

More at Yahoo! Reuters | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Heart Transplant Outcomes, Pollution Increases Lung Transplant Rejection Risk

Tags: Organ Donation, Organ Transplants, Transplant Rejection, Cilostamide, Regulatory T Cells, Live Donor, Immunosuppressants

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