Lab Notes / Tags / Page B / Boston University School of Medicine

Extra! Extra! Get Your Protein.

High Protein Diet May Lead to Lower BP

Consuming a high-protein diet may lower your risk for developing hypertension, suggest researchers. Published in American Journal of Hypertension, the study showed that adults consuming the highest amount of protein (average 100 grams daily) enjoyed a 40 percent reduced risk of high blood pressure compared to adults with the lowest intake of protein. Researchers say that after four years of follow-up, the adults who consumed more protein from either plant or animal sources had statistically significantly lower systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure levels. The beneficial effects were seen for both overweight and normal weight individuals.

More at EurekAlert | Posted 4 years ago by Peggy Rowland

Previously: Dietary Protein Helps Prevent Hip Fractures

Tags: American Journal of Hypertension, Boston University School of Medicine, High Protein Diets, High Protein Energy Bars, Hypertension Risk Factors

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Magic Mushrooms

Mushrooms a Great Source of Vitamin D

Mushrooms containing vitamin D2 - from exposure to ultraviolet light - can provide as much vitamin D as supplements say researchers from Boston University School of Medicine. The study included 30 healthy adults who took either 2000 IU of vitamin D2, vitamin D3 or mushroom powder daily for 12 weeks during the winter. Baseline serum Vitamin D levels were similar for all participants. Blood tests taken during and after the study showed an increase and maintenance of vitamin D levels which were also similar for all participants. Adequate amounts of vitamin D are essential for bone health, muscle strength and for modulating the immune system to help fight infections and reduce the risk of certain cancers, heart disease, diabetes and depression.

More at Eurekalert.org | Posted 6 years ago by Melody Lesser

Previously: Low Vitamin D Linked to Headaches

Tags: Boston University School of Medicine, Cancer, Depression, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Immune System, Infections, Mushrooms, Vitamin D, Vitamin D3, Mushrooms and Vitamin D, Vitamin D2

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When Diagnosis Certain

Antibiotics Good for Middle Ear Infection

Despite some guidelines that say otherwise, antibiotics may still be good for treating middle ear infection when the diagnosis is certain, find two recent studies. The research, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, shows that symptoms may disappear sooner when an antibiotic like amoxicillin-clavulanate is used. According to MSNBC, the new results contradict the latest recommendation by the American Academy of Family Physicians to use a "watchful-waiting approach" for most cases. Dr. Jerome O. Klein of the Boston University School of Medicine believes that the new study findings offer "the best data yet" on whether antibiotics are a good treatment for middle ear infections. He says the answer is "yes."

More at MSNBC | Posted 8 years ago by Peggy Rowland

Previously: Antibiotics May Not Help with Ear Infections

Tags: Boston University School of Medicine, Middle Ear Infection Treatment, Antibiotics for Ear Infection May Work, Watchful-Waiting Approach, American Academy of Family Physicians, Jerome O. Klein

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (44%) / No! (56%)

Mind, Body, Spirit

Study Finds Positive Connection Between Yoga, Mood

Yoga may be superior to other forms of exercise when it comes to uplifting one’s mood and reducing anxiety, finds a new study from Boston University’s School of Medicine. The study is the first to examine yoga postures, gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) levels in the brain, and anxiety levels. Researchers compared two groups. The first practiced yoga three times a week for one hour sessions while the other spent time walking during the 12-week course of the study. The findings indicate that healthy individuals who practiced yoga increased GABA levels and reported a significant decrease in anxiety and improvements in mood. Study authors say the promising research warrants additional study but that yoga might be beneficial for individuals with certain mental health disorders.

More at Eurekalert.org | Posted 8 years ago by Melody Lesser

Tags: Boston University School of Medicine, Depression, Mental Health, Mind Body Connection, Yoga, Gamma-Aminobutyric, GABBA

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (47%) / No! (53%)

Slim Down to Stay Sane

Middle Age Belly Fat Risk for Dementia

Having extra abdominal fat during middle age could put you at greater risk for developing dementia later, say researchers from Boston University School of Medicine. "Our findings, while preliminary, provide greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the link between obesity and dementia," said Dr. Sudha Seshadri. For the study, published in Annals of Neurology, researchers analyzed the link between waist circumference, Body Mass Index (BMI), waist to hip ratio and measures of abdominal fat from a CT with MRI measures of total brain volume and more in middle-aged study participants. Researchers say the results confirmed the association of increasing BMI with lower brain volumes in middle-aged and older adults.

More at EureakAlert | Posted 9 years ago by Peggy Rowland

Previously: Spouses of Dementia Patients Face Risk of Dementia

Tags: Body Mass Index, Dementia Risk, Abdominal Fat Dangers, Abdominal Fat Risks, Dementia Risk Factors, Annals of Neurology, Waist to Hip Ratio, Abdominal Fat During Middle Age, Dr. Sudha Seshadri, Boston University School of Medicine

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (47%) / No! (53%)