August 17, 2010

Tracking Is Key to Survival

1 Persistent Elevated Heart Rate Linked to Death

A persistent, elevated resting heart rate has been linked to a higher risk of death say researchers at NY-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Med. Ctr. who found that a heart rate greater than 84 beats per minute, that developed or persisted over the course of a five-year study, was associated with a 79 percent greater risk of death. "Heart rates can change day to day and year to year. It's like having a higher body temperature one day that goes away the next. Something caused the fever, but it has resolved, perhaps with treatment. Heart rate is the same over a longer time span. If it goes up and remains elevated, some disorder is likely to blame," says lead researcher Dr. Peter Okin who recommends tracking heart rate over time to determine at-risk patients.

More at Eurekalert.org | Posted 7 years ago by Melody Lesser

Previously: Cycle Affects Change in Vitals When Intubated

Tags: Heart Rate, Elevated Heart Rate, NY-Presbyterian Hospital/Cornell Weill Medical Center, Dr. Peter Okin

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (43%) / No! (57%)

Males Have More Hearing Loss

2 More Adolescents Experiencing Hearing Loss

Hearing loss among today's adolescents in the U.S. could be significantly higher than levels seen from 1988 through 1994. New findings from researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston using two nationally representative surveys reveal that young people today are losing more hearing. Compared to 1988 to 1994, levels of hearing loss of adolescents aged 12 to 19 years were 31 percent worse in 2005 to 2006. About one in five adolescents in the study experienced hearing loss in 2005 to 2006. While most of the hearing loss was mild, girls were significantly less likely than boys to demonstrate hearing loss. Researchers say that more studies are needed to determine the cause of rising levels of hearing loss among adolescents.

More at EureakAlert | Posted 7 years ago by Peggy Rowland

Previously: Levitra Side Effects

Tags: Hearing Loss, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Josef Shargorodsky, Hearing Loss in Teens, Teens Losing Hearing

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Disease Named After Wrong Man?

3 Lou Gehrig Perhaps Didn't Have Lou Gehrig's

Yankee legend Lou Gehrig may have really died from a condition caused by concussion-like trauma, not Lou Gehrig's disease (A.L.S.), reports New York Times. Doctors from the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Bedford, Mass., and the Boston University School of Medicine believe that markings in spinal cords of one boxer a couple of players who had a diagnosis of A.L.S. reveal that the men really didn't have the disease after all. The men had a fatal disease that erodes the body's central nervous system in ways like A.L.S. Lou Gehrig had a history of concussions, which would cause the condition. While the doctors didn't mention Gehrig's name in their peer-reviewed paper, they have used him as an example in interviews to illustrate cases like his.

More at New York Times | Posted 7 years ago by Peggy Rowland

Previously: Health News About Lou Gehrig's

Tags: ALS, Lou Gehrig's Disease, Lou Gehrig's, Lou Gehrig's Named After Wrong Man, Lou Gehrig's Risks, What Really Killed Lou Gehrig, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, A.L.S., Diseases Like ALS

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (40%) / No! (60%)

Reduced Risk of Heart Failure

4 Dark Chocolate Again Linked to Heart Health

Women who ate an average of one to two servings of high-quality chocolate per week had a 32 percent lower risk of developing heart failure. Researchers from Boston, who followed over 31,000 women in Sweden over a nine-year period also found that those who had smaller quantities, one to three servings per month, still had a 26 percent reduced risk. But more isn’t always better – those who ate chocolate daily did not appear to benefit. Dark chocolate that has high concentrations of flavonoids in chocolate may lower blood pressure, reducing the risk for heart diseases. Study leader Murray Mittleman MD DrPH recommends looking for chocolate with a high cocoa quantity. The majority of the chocolate consumed in the study contained at least 30% cocoa solids.

More at WebMD | Posted 7 years ago by Denise Reynolds

Previously: Chocolate Lowers Blood Pressure, Reduces Risk of Heart Disease, Dark Chocolate May Guard Brain from Stroke

Tags: Chocolate, Chocolate and Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Women's Health, Dark Chocolate

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (45%) / No! (55%)

You: Back to School

5 Foods to Avoid for School Lunches

Dr. Michael Roizen, author and MD at the Cleveland Clinic, appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America to talk about foods that children should avoid for lunch, whether eating in the school cafeteria or bringing their own “brown bag.” He recommends avoiding processed lunch meats, such as bologna, which carry an increased risk of heart disease and cancer. Parents should look for unprocessed meats such as turkey breast or roast beef and should use 100 percent whole grain bread. Instead of battered and fried chicken nuggets, which are high in saturated fat and sodium, he recommends finding a brand that uses lean white-meat chicken and whole-grain breading and baking in the oven. Avoid gelatins and sugar-laden puddings and opt for fresh or canned fruit instead.

More at ABC Good Morning America | Posted 7 years ago by Denise Reynolds

Previously: Revamped Cafeterias Lead to Healthy Eating, Banning Junk Food in Schools Proves Effective

Tags: Children's Health, Nutrition, School Children, School Lunches

Read the Comments (1) | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Toxic Protein in Spinal Cord

6 Head Injuries May Be Linked to ALS in Athletes

Scientists believe that head injuries athletes experience may be tied to ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The same toxic proteins found in the spinal cords of athletes who suffered head injuries and developed ALS were present in the brains of athletes who suffered chronic traumatic encephalopathy. It was also observed that a very high number of football players have developed ALS. Athletes that did not die of ALS and people who were not athletes but died of ALS did not have the toxic proteins in the spines. ALS attacks neurons in the brain and spinal cord leaving patients unable to move or speak. Results were reported on HBO’s “Real Sports” and will be published in the Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology.

More at Yahoo! AP | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Stem Cell Treatment Used on First Human Patients

Tags: ALS, Brain, Lou Gehrig’s Disease, Spinal Cord, Toxic Protein

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Same Drug, Different Information

7 Prescription Drug Pamphlets Not Uniform

A new study states that the leaflets available to consumers at the pharmacy counter about a drug vary at each pharmacy and may not be easy to read and understand. Researchers picked two common drugs-lisinopril and metformin-used to treat hypertension and diabetes, respectively, and looked at leaflets about them. The leaflets ranged from 30 to 2500 words, with the lengthier ones containing all the info the Food and Drug Administration recommends be made available. The wordier ones did contain more information, but most did not meet 80 percent of the “usefulness criteria” researchers developed from FDA standards and formatting issues made finding important information difficult. Kimberlin said this study demonstrates the need for uniform medication information for consumers.

More at Yahoo! Reuters | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: CVS Caremark Drops Walgreens from Coverage

Tags: Food and Drug Administration, Prescription Drug Pamphlets, Prescription Drug Leaflets, Medication Information

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (48%) / No! (52%)

Focus on Genes and Environment

8 Panel Will Decide Breast Cancer Research Funding

Next month a 19 member Interagency Breast Cancer and Environmental Research Coordinating Committee that includes federal agencies, doctors and advocates will meet to decide how research money for breast cancer will be spent. One in eight women in the U.S. diagnosed with breast cancer annual and even though factors like obesity, age, several genes and childbearing affect the risk, there are a lot of cases that cannot be explained. The committee is going to focus research into the genetic and environmental causes. Although death rates due to cancer are decreasing, many still are concerned that chemicals in the environment are linked to several different types of cancer and researchers want to make sure the money that is available for research is being used in the most resourceful way.

More at Yahoo! Reuters | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Protein Affects Breast Cancer Growth and Outcome

Tags: Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Research, Funding for Breast Cancer Research, Genetic and Environmental Factors of Breast Cancer

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Young Drug Abusers at Risk

9 Amphetamines Linked to Aortic Dissection

People under 50 who abuse amphetamines may be more likely to suffer from aortic dissection, a tear in the artery that sends blood throughout the body. Researchers long suspected this drug, which make the heart pump harder and causes hypertension, was linked to this usually fatal condition. Medical records from 31 million people ages 18 to 49 hospitalized from 1995 to 2007 and from 49 million people over 50 found that abuse of this drug by 18 to 49 year olds tripled the risk. Four states with a higher than average rate of amphetamine abuse-California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington-had three times the rate of aortic dissection among young people. Dr. Arthur Westover said "Doctors should screen young adults with aortic dissection for amphetamine abuse in searching for a potential cause."

More at Yahoo! Reuters | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: Many Poker Players Use Drugs to Enhance Skills

Tags: Amphetamines, Aortic Dissection, Amphetamine Drug Abuse

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (44%) / No! (56%)

Almost One Million Kids Affected

10 Immaturity in Kids Leading to Misdiagnosis of ADHD

A new study suggests that approximately one million children may be misdiagnosed with ADHD when they may just be intellectually and emotionally immature compared to their peers. Twelve thousand children were studied and it was found that “the youngest kindergartners were 60 percent more like to be misdiagnosed with ADHD than the oldest children in the same grade.” Spending on prescriptions could be costing 320 to 500 million dollars annually and 80 to 90 percent of it paid for by Medicaid. Ritalin is most commonly prescribed, but the long term health effects which are not known. Elder, lead author of the study believes that teachers perceive poor behavior by the youngest kids in a class as ADHD which lead doctors to diagnose them with the condition.

More at Yahoo! AFP | Posted 7 years ago by Kristie Hayes

Previously: ADHD Linked to Socioeconomic Risk Factors

Tags: ADHD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Misdiagnosis of ADHD, Ritalin, Kindergartners, Emotional and Intellectual Immaturity

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (43%) / No! (57%)

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