April 15, 2010

Complete with Calories

1 New York Times Food Critic Posts His Food Diary

The recently appointed food critic for the New York Times posted a week's worth of his food diary on his Times blog today, complete with calorie counts. During the week Mr. Sifton ate a total of 24,560 calories, for a total of over 3,500 calories per day. Even subtracting his estimate calories burned through exercise, his daily total still exceeds 2,900 calories. A good rule of thumb for a sedentary worker of normal weight is 2,000 calories per day. Mr. Sifton admitted that the diary was "fairly terrifying." Among the foods eaten by the food critic were pancakes, poached duck eggs, doughnuts, oysters Rockefeller, and fried rabbit livers on toast with pepper jelly.

More at New York Times | Posted 8 years ago by Mark

Tags: New York Times. Sam Sifton, Food Critics, Food Diaries

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (47%) / No! (53%)

Life Giving or Germ Ridden?

2 Raw Milk: the Battle Is Engaged

Advocates for the consumption of unpasteurized milk held a national conference on Saturday, while scientists and health educators today launched RealRawMilkFacts.com to present the mainstream viewpoint. Some raw milk advocates claim that it is a miracle cure for asthma and other illnesses, while public health officials warn that raw milk can be extremely dangerous, especially to children and others with compromised immune systems. Retail sale of unpasteurized milk outside of the farm is illegal in 40 states. In most states raw milk fans must go through the ruse of buying a share in a cow so that they are technically the owner of the milk. Among the contaminants that can occur in raw milk are E. coli and O157:H7. Pasteurization is the process of heating milk to 161 degrees for 15 seconds.

More at USA Today | Posted 8 years ago by Mark

Tags: Raw Milk, Pasteurization, RealRawMilkFacts.com

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (46%) / No! (54%)

Fun and Educational

3 Marion Nestle Loves Jamie Oliver's Reality Show

Nutrition and public health professor at New York University Marion Nestle admits in a blog post that she loves the controversial reality show Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution. The author of bestsellers like What to Eat and Food Politics admits that Oliver is less than tactful, but she says that he's performing an invaluable service by showing the reality of school food and what it will take to fix it. Nestle is surprised that so many food policy experts are trashing the show, and suspects that many are miffed that they weren't involved in the production. Nestle has been involved in actual school food interventions, and she says that it's more complicated than the show implies. But the show is getting people talking about the problem, and that's a good thing.

More at Food Politics | Posted 8 years ago by Mark

Tags: Jamie Oliver, Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution, Marion Nestle, What to Eat, Food Politics, New York University

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (41%) / No! (59%)

KFC's Is Health Food

4 10 Sandwiches with More Calories Than Double Down

"The Double Down, via KFC: Rice Starch, Soy Protein Concentrate, Salt, Sodium Phosphates, Monosodium Glutamate, Tapioca Dextrin, High Amylose Corn Starch, Nonfat Dry Milk, Dried Egg Whites, Low Trans Fat Oil (RDB) Soybean or Corn/Soy Blend With or Without TBHQ"
- Mike in the comments

We don't mean to pack our ranking with Double Down news, but KFC's breadless sandwich is doing what it was designed to do: get the company a lot of publicity. Canadian bariatric physician Yoni Freedhoff has written several posts on KFC's latest contribution to what Yoni calls "frankenfood." Today's post pointed out something that NYU nutrition professor Marion Nestle also pointed out on her blog: if you ignore the sodium the Double Down is virtually health food compared to many other fast food and chain restaurant meals. Yoni lists 10 common fast food sandwiches that have higher calories than the Double Down. Quiznos' Prime Rib Cheesesteak Sub comes in at number 1 with 1,770 calories, and Applebees and Ruby Tuesday are close behind. Even number 10, a tuna sandwich, has 660 calories.

More at Weighty Matters (Yoni Freedhoff Blog) | Posted 8 years ago by Mark

Previously: I Ate McDonald's Mega Burgers All Day and Lived

Tags: Double Down, Fast Food, KFC Double Down, Quiznos, Ruby Tuesday, Calories, Calorie Countn, Family Restaurants, Applebee s

Read the Comments (1) | Was this Interesting? Yes! (48%) / No! (52%)

Truth As Strange As Fiction

5 The Grossest Fast Food Concepts

When it comes to ideas about what we ought to put in our mouths, American fast food companies (and comics, for that matter) are pretty ingenious. TreeHugger blogger Brian Merchant recently commemorated five of the ickiest ideas ever perpetrated on fast food eaters, including Jimmy Dean's pancake and sausage on a stick, Burger King's Japanese Windows 7 burger, and the new KFC Double Down "sandwich." Included also are two made up but not far from reality meals from "Saturday Night Live": chocolate mini doughnuts as a breakfast cereal and a many, many layered taco that includes a pizza, blueberry pancake, crepe and three different kinds of tacos, all deep fried and served with chili. If you ask us, they probably shouldn't be giving the fast food companies any ideas.

More at AlterNet | Posted 8 years ago by Sarah E. White

Previously: Taste-Testing the Double Down

Tags: Fast Food, Junk Food, KFC, Burger King, McDonalds, Saturday Night Live

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (46%) / No! (54%)

Teens, Alcohol Use, & Cancer

6 Teenage Alcohol Use Tied to Benign Breast Disease

Women developing benign breast disease in their early twenties are now discovering that this could be caused by excessive drinking in their past. The Harvard based "Growing Up Today" study showed that the risk of developing benign breast lumps or cysts increased fivefold for the participants who drank six or more days of the week. Even drinking as little as three days a week dramatically increases the risk of breast disease forming. Researchers do not yet know why adolescent alcohol use increases breast disease, but are concerned about this knowledge for unless the individual decreases their drinking with age, breast cancer is likely to emerge from what was formerly benign.

More at WebMD | Posted 8 years ago by Kristen Jett

Tags: Adolescent, Cancer, Cancer Prevention, Teen, Alcohol

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (48%) / No! (52%)

Next Benefit: Tummy Friendly?

7 Heartburn Free Coffee May be on the Way

European researchers studying why coffee irritates the stomach have ironically discovered that one of the chemicals in coffee actually stops acid production. Most of the ingredients and chemicals within coffee do just the opposite — increase acid production. This discovery has lead to the question — can we make coffee truly stomach friendly, or more importantly, can we create a coffee that actually prevents heartburn? If you're worried this concept won't get enough study time, have no fear. In the United States alone, an estimated 40 million people avoid coffee because of the ill effects it has on them. This idea is sure to be top notch on the to do list for coffee creators.

More at Health.com | Posted 8 years ago by Kristen Jett

Tags: Heart Health, Heart Healthy Diet, Coffee, Heartburn

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (48%) / No! (52%)

Hair Today. Gone Tomorrow

8 Scientists Find Gene That May Cause Hair Loss

Researchers have discovered a human gene that they believe may affect hair growth. The discovery is being investigated to determine if new treatments for male pattern baldness can be created or hair removal processes can be developed. The team, located at Columbia, Rockefeller and Stanford Universities found the APCDD1 gene which causes a hair condition known as hypotrichosis simplex which is a progressive condition that starts at childhood and develops into adult age. The condition causes hair follicles to shrink and narrow over time, causing thick hair to be replaced by fine hair and "peach fuzz." During testing on Mice scientists discovered that they could use the gene to turn on and off hair growth is the rodents, unfortunately no human experiments have taken place at this time.

More at CNN Health | Posted 8 years ago by James Johnson

Tags: Hair Loss, Hair Growth, Hair Removal, Human Genes, Genes

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (47%) / No! (53%)

Left Out When It Comes to Sex

9 Getting Closer to Female Viagra?

Viagra was approved for sale in 1998, but the scientific world has been lagging when it comes to a similar medication for women. Medical giant Pfizer has been working on the development of a drug that will boost female sexual arousal and increase the chance of orgasm. While it is still in development, testing of a prototype has begun on animal subjects. The most recent experiment involved stimulating arousal in bunnies and then injecting them with the drug. Results show the drug blocks an enzyme that checks blood flow to the arousal region, allowing for greater blood flow and increased arousal in the rabbits. Pfizer still has a lot of work to do to come up with a workable drug, and years of drug trials will no doubt keep a female Viagra out of the market for the foreseeable future.

More at Health News | Posted 8 years ago by Marty Shaw

Tags: Sex, Female Viagra, Pfizer

Read the Comments (1) | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Working Leads to Smiles

10 Working Is Good for Your Health

Research has shown that going to work is actually good for your health both physically and mentally in the long-term. Due to health-related issues, people sometimes take weeks, months and even years off work. However, this actually leads to other problems like social isolation, diminished confidence levels and mental health complications. The UK has recently introduced Fitness to Work certificates. This would hopefully encourage sick or injured employees to get back to work faster.

More at Wales Online | Posted 8 years ago by Yi Chen

Tags: Office, Work, Employment, Sick, Injury, Illness, Prolong Leave, Health

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (51%) / No! (49%)

Mount Sinai Research

11 Genes Help Detect Pregnancy Complications Early

Specific genetic markers on the placenta may indicate the likelihood of a woman developing pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia or fetal growth restriction. Although they were once thought to be static after the first trimester, researchers at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine have found that these markers change over the course of the pregnancy, which might make it possible to identify windows of opportunity to detect and respons to risks. Genomic imprinting is a process that occurs in the placenta, and epigenetics may be able to modify how a gene behaves without altering the DNA. About 10 percent of pregnancies experience complications from preeclampsia or fetal growth restriction.

More at Medical News | Posted 8 years ago by Denise Reynolds

Previously: Decline in Maternal Deaths Globally, Weight Loss Surgery May Prevent Complications

Tags: Genetic Predisposition, Hypertensive Disorders During Pregnancy, Pregnancy

Comment on This | Was this Interesting? Yes! (46%) / No! (54%)

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